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  • Enjoy Peruvian Food at 30,000 Feet

    LAN Peru is giving travelers who have had Peru on their foodie destination radar another incentive to book that trip sooner than later. For a limited time, LAN Peru is helping travelers start their culinary experience the minute they step onboard by serving iconic, traditional Peruvian cuisine on the in-flight menu from Los Angeles, New York, Miami to Peru.

  • Mistura’s Greatest Hits

    by Erika Schuler

    Lima, September.
    An enormous grey blanket looms over the city, but there hasn’t been any rain. Some say Lima is gloomy in winter. But if you look closer, the city is having a party.

    Mistura is on.

  • We Made the Dean’s List

    LATAM Airlines Group, comprised of LAN Airlines and TAM Airlines, was just named “The Best Airline for Students, Latin Market.” That’s according to StudentUniverse, the world’s leading travel booking site for students and youth.

  • 4 Best Sunset Spots in Lima

    Lima can be a crazily hectic, incredibly busy city. When I want to reconnect with nature and have a few moments of peace, I head to the Pacific. For some reason, the sea always brings me solace.

    One of my favorite times to head there is just before dusk, when the ocean and the sun meet briefly to steal away a goodnight kiss.

    The way the sun sets the sky ablaze in fiery reds and oranges really is unparalleled. While you can catch this Pacific sunset anywhere along the 1,400 miles (2,250 km) of Peru’s pristine coastline, there’s something really special about Lima’s.

  • Hawaii of Peru: Family Fun and Adventures in Máncora

    For our neighbors to the north (Northern Hemisphere, that is), spring break is here and summer is just around the corner. For those hoping to get away for a little vacay, now is the perfect time to start planning it.

    One region that I recently discovered is Northern Peru. Its pristine beaches, endless outdoor activities and cuisine all its own make it a great getaway for the entire family. Plus, Northern Peru already serves as a playground for Peruvians, so the infrastructure for family-friendly activities and accommodations are already in place.

    Perhaps the most developed city to visit in Northern Peru is Máncora. Called the “Hawaii of Peru,” Máncora is one of Peru’s most popular beach towns. Consistently warm weather and clear skies mean vacationers flock here year-round.

  • Beyond the Boardroom: How to Get the Most out of a Business Trip to Peru

    Between shuttling from the plane to your hotel suite to the boardroom, more often than not, business travel is anything but a vacation. No matter how exotic the location, for businessmen and women, trips abroad often consist of back-to-back meetings sandwiched in between long flights.

    To break up the monotony and even get inspired, it’s important to stretch your legs, get a little fresh air and take in the culture of the places you are visiting.

    If you are coming to Peru for a business trip, chances are you will be stationed in the capital, Lima. This sprawling metropolis of nine million inhabitants provides the perfect opportunity to experience the city a few hours at a time. 

    Peru Pro Tip: Check out our guide to the Peruvian Power Lunch for tips on how to have a successful and memorable business lunch.

  • Photo: Ken Bosma

    How to Do Machu Picchu in 36 Hours

    In order to really take in everything Machu Picchu and the surrounding Cusco region have to offer – their Andean peaks, Inca ruins and seemingly endless adventure – you’d have to spend weeks in the area. While experiencing the ins and outs of the region is worth it, the truth is, most vacationers don’t have that kind of time. The good news is, a trip to Machu Picchu doesn’t have to be all or nothing. If you are just passing through Peru on a business trip or a long layover, you can make it to Machu Picchu and back to Lima for your flight home in less time than it’ll take you to binge watch the first two seasons of “Friends.”

    Note: LAN has flexible flight times that can suit even the tightest of vacation plans. This is a mock itinerary meant to show you that Machu Picchu is a possible feat even on the shortest of time budgets. Feel free to copy it and change the times and activities to suit your needs.

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    Channelling Andy Warhol: Lima “Pops” with Two Temporary Modern Art Exhibits

    Walk down any street in Peru’s densely populated capital and you’re sure to become enveloped in this city of contrasts. Modern skyscrapers neighbour colonial mansions with Spanish tile roofs. Restaurants serving ancient Peruvian recipes like anticuchos also dish up new fusion-style cuisine. And museums abound, some with artifacts from another era, others with contemporary art from some of the 20th century’s most influential photographers.

    Such examples of this can be found in Barranco’s two art museums where haute couture fashion photographers’ work is currently on display in both permanent and temporary exhibitions. 

  • Photo: Vichayito

    Happy Campers: Beachfront Glamping in Máncora

    This may come across as a bit of a surprise, but I am not a camping kind of gal. While the idea of sleeping in a tent beneath the stars intrigues me, the idea of sleeping in a tent beneath the stars also terrifies me. You see, even though I’m an adventurer at heart – I like to surf and white water raft and mountain climb as much as the next adrenaline seeker – I much prefer to come home to running water, flushing toilets, and a plush mattress draped in luxurious linens when the adventure is over.

    That’s why when I heard about glamping in Máncora, a beach town on Peru’s northern coast, I jumped at the opportunity.

  • Photo: Elena

    A Sip of Summer: The 5 Must-Try Drinks in Peru

    Limonada Clasica

    On a hot summer day, few drinks replenish your body quite like an ice-cold limonada. Made from water, sugar and Peruvian limes, this tart beverage will quench your thirst and cool you off like none other. The best part about the limonada is that most restaurants make it to order, so you can get more or less sugar depending on your sweet tooth.

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    10 Tips of Taking Taxis in Lima (The Airport Edition)

    When I travel in my native U.S.A., I know exactly what to do to get from point A (usually the airport) to point B (usually my hotel). I always have a friend or family member pick me up, rent a car or take a cab. Little preparation needs to be made prior to my trip because the process is straightforward in the states. Plus, even if it isn’t, everyone speaks my language, so I can easily ask for help should I need it.

    Traveling abroad, however, is a different story. It always gives me a bit of anxiety. Will there be cabs waiting for me? How will I know which one to take? How do I give the driver directions? How do I make sure they charge me the right amount?

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    Ají Peppers: The Secret is in the Sauce

    It´s no secret: Peru is all the rage and Peruvian food, which is quite literally on the tip of everyone´s tongues, has taken center stage. What sets the nation´s dishes apart from the rest of the world is as much the preparation as it is the fresh ingredients. After all, without this special combination, lomo saltado is nothing more than steak and potatoes. One ingredient that really brings even the simplest foods to life is ají, a type of chili pepper endlessly used in everything from chifa to ceviche. It´s been used as long as people have been cooking in the country currently known as Peru (we´re talking about 7,000 years), so the trial by fire (pun intended) period is over. Peruvians have the ají, and how to use it, down to a science.

  • Photo: Troy Tolley, RPP and Toshiyuki IMAI (left to right)

    Cheers to National Chilcano Week

    Argentina and Chile are world-renowned for their wine. In Brazil cachaça, made from sugarcane, is king. For Colombia, the liquor of choice is an anise-flavored aguardiente. And in Peru, our national trago is a grape-derived brandy called pisco.

    Peruvians often add a little local flair to traditional cocktails by holding the rum (in say a mojito) or forgoing the tequila (in a margarita), opting instead for a pour of pisco. And while this Peruvianizes just about any drink, it’s not nearly as authentic as one of Peru’s favorite cocktails, the chilcano.

  • Terra’s Top Travel Resolutions for 2015

    January — it’s a month of new beginnings, a time when people vow to better their lifestyles, kick a bad habit to the curb and become more productive. The problem with these New Year’s resolutions is that they rarely stick. Busy lives get in the way or people discover that their goals were a bit too lofty. Whatever the reason, many people fail at resolving their resolutions.

    That’s why this year, I vowed to make my resolution one I can look forward to beforehand, enjoy while I’m actually doing it, and look back on with fond memories. My resolution is to see more of Peru and I am inviting you, dear Only in South America readers, to join me.

  • Photo: Gisela Giardino

    How to Volunteer in Peru

    Traveling to the corners of the world has given me so much. Perspective, compassion, adventure, insight and knowledge are just a few of the traits I’ve brought home with me after exploring sights and places previously unknown. Journeying through Peru is no different.

    This country, so full of rich treasures, provides travelers with an unparalleled experience: the Amazon, with its densely verdant landscape and diverse ecosystem; the Andes, which took millions of years to form and now wind through seven South American nations; and the coast, complete with butter-soft sand and breathtaking views. Pair Peru’s natural wonders with its complex history and booming future and you’ve got a nation that gives travelers more in one visit than they could have ever dreamed of.

  • Photo: ChristmasStockImages.com

    The Perfect Peruvian New Year’s Party

    New Year’s Eve is quickly approaching, which means if you’re coming to Peru for the festivities, you should start making plans for how you’ll say goodbye to 2014 and ring in 2015 now.

    The epicenters for New Year’s Eve celebrations in Peru are Lima and Cusco, though parties and festivals go down in every city throughout the Andean nation. For a no-frills celebration, reach out to your hostel or hotel to ask what it has planned. Depending on the property, you can expect everything from a simple champagne toast at midnight to a raging party that continues into the wee hours of the morning.

    If hitting the bars and clubs is more your thing, keep reading. 

  • How To Add a Peruvian Twist to Any Holiday Meal

    It’s that time of year again. Whether you celebrate Thanksgiving (Nov. 27), Hanukkah (Dec. 16-24), Yule (Dec. 21), Nochebuena (Dec. 24), Christmas (Dec. 25), Kwanzaa (Dec. 26-Jan.1) or something else entirely, chances are sometime within the next month, you, your family and your friends will gather ’round the dinner table to express your blessings and share a meal together. And while tradition – I’m talking foods like turkey to latkes and everything in between – is nice, sometimes it’s worth spicing up the holiday spread. 

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    A Chocolate Factory in Peru that Would Make Willy Wonka Proud

    It’s been 50 years since Roald Dahl penned the story of the penniless Charlie Bucket getting his hands on the winning chocolate bar in his 1964 book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. The golden ticket, which was tucked inside the chocolate bar, gave Charlie and four other kids access to a world most children can only dream of – chocolate rivers surrounded by “eatable marshmallow pillows, likable wallpaper […], hot ice creams for cold days, cows that give chocolate milk, fizzy lifting drinks [and] square sweets that look round.”

    That book, which Hollywood later turned into two movies has inspired anyone with a sweet tooth to dream big. That’s why I decided I had to celebrate Dahl’s semi-centennial with a trip to Peru’s very own chocolate factory – the ChocoMuseo.

  • Photo: Linda Paul

    The Boleto Turístico: Everything You Need to Know About Peru’s Tourist Ticket

    Even before Peru became a nation, Cusco was an important city. Five centuries ago, it was the heart of the Incas. During its prime, the Incas used Cusco as the capital of their ever-growing empire and actually viewed it as more important than Machu Picchu. It is where the Spanish established their power which lead to the decline in the Inca empire and the rise of Spanish control over Peru. Nowadays, Cusco is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, a place that nearly two million visitors embark on each year.

    For these reasons Cusco, and the surrounding area known as el Valle Sagrado, contain a wealth of history, museums and archaeological sites. 

  • Lima Cool

    By Marco Aviles, in Magazine
    Photos by: Daniel Silva

    A treasure-filled bookstore only open in the afternoon, the town’s second-best cebichería and an art space where pop reigns supreme – come along on an alternate route through Peru’s ever-changing capital.

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    Where to Watch Football Games in Lima, Peru

    America’s love affair with watching grown men pummel each other as they outrun their opponents while carrying a prolate spheroid a few dozen yards is still an alien concept in much of the world. Peru is no different. Here fútbol is king; football, not so much. But for the sports fans to whom Sundays are sacred, their dedication to the football doesn’t go on vacation — even when they find themselves in a foreign country.

  • 3 Ways to Celebrate Peru during Hispanic Heritage Month

    It all started in 1968 when U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson proclaimed that he wanted to celebrate one of the fastest growing populations in America – Latinos. Thus, National Hispanic Heritage Week was born. Fast forward to 1989 and that week-long observance was turned into a full month of celebrating the culture and traditions of people who are from or trace their roots to Spain, Mexico or the Spanish-speaking nations from Central America, South America and the Caribbean.

    Hispanic Heritage Month kicks off each year on Sept. 15 and it’s for good reason – this day is Independence Day for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. Additionally, Mexico and Chile celebrate their Independence from Spain on Sept. 16 and Sept. 18, respectively.

    While Peru commemorates its Fiestas Patrias – the day the nation broke away from Spain – on July 28, Peruvians by birth and by association (you know, those who just love all things Peru) can still celebrate the Andean nation through Oct. 15.

    Here’s our three-step guide to celebrating this month-long American tradition with an air of Peruvian flair!

  • World Tourism Day: 9 Reasons to Visit Peru Now

    People around the world are in the midst of celebrating my favorite pastime and ultimate passion – travel. Commemorated each year on Sept. 27, the United Nations created World Tourism Day back in 1980 as a way of recognizing the positive contributions travel makes to local economies, cultural preservation, environmental protection and personal growth and enrichment.

    Our planet is a big place, full of majestic destinations to discover. While there are a heap of world wonders to uncover, this amazing Andean nation should be toward the top of your list. Here are the nine reasons you should visit Peru now!

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    An Adrenaline-Inducing Day Trip to Huacachina

    Remember that one cartoon where the main character is stranded in the middle of a never-ending desert? He drags himself over the sizzling hot sand while the sun relentlessly beats down. In the distance, he sees palm tree that provides shade and a lake that has limitless cold drinking water. Re-energized at the thought of this oasis, he rushes over, prepared to dive into the swimming pool only to have it all dissipate into thin air. It was all a mirage stirred up by his thirst.

    When I first set eyes on the desert oasis of Huacachina (wa-ka-CHEE-nah), I reverted back to my childhood for a moment. It was like that cartoon I had watched dozens of times had appeared right before my eyes. My six-year-old self was impressed.

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    Andean Weavers: The Thread that Ties Peru’s Past to the Present

    While Cusco has become a cosmopolitan hub – one that overflows with jet setting travelers, luxe hotels and restaurants owned by renowned chefs – the mountainside that surrounds the former Inca capital tells a completely different story. There, life has changed very little during the last several centuries. Villagers still live off of the land, growing and raising nearly everything they eat. And, men and women still shepherd their sheep, llama and alpaca through verdant fields, cook meals over an open flame and participate in a tradition as old as the civilizations that make up Peru – Andean weaving.

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    Shopping for Souvenirs in Peru

    Perdoname,” I said, interrupting a shopkeeper organizing miniature versions of Machu Picchu. “Tiene La Ultima Cena con el cuy.” He didn’t, so, I exited what must’ve been the twentieth store I asked, sighing, “Oh well. On to the 21st.”

    I did finally hunt down the Cusqueñan version of the Last Supper painting my mother requested and now has framed in her living room, but it wasn’t without my fair share of begging, asking, demanding, searching and, of course, haggling.

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    Welcome to the Jungle: Peru’s Piece of Heaven on Earth

    With its towering trees and endless landscape, the Peruvian Amazon is quickly becoming a hot-spot for environmentally conscious travelers looking to experience one of the most diverse ecosystems in the world. In an attempt to meet demand, ecolodges in the Amazon jungle are becoming more and more common. While each has an array of amenities, unique itineraries and different opportunities to see the plants and animals that inhabit the rainforest, Refugio Amazonas’ commitment to sustainable travel makes it stand out from the rest.

  • An Insider’s Guide to the Ultimate Peru Packing List

    Between the expansive coastal desert, the snowcapped mountains that stretch towards the sky and the verdant forests that make up the Amazon jungle, Peru is one of the most visually interesting countries in Latin America. Alongside its diverse landscape and culture is an equally varied climate.

    All of this can make packing for an adventure in Peru a bit tricky. But fear not; there is an art to making sure all the essentials make it in your suitcase, while still leaving space for the knickknacks you collect along your journey.

  • Photo: Paul Silva

    Mistura 2014: Your Guide to Getting your Grub On

    While it’s only recently received a nod from the international food community for its innovative dishes, creative ingredients and chefs who are committed to nothing less than perfection, Peru is (and has always been) a serious food country. Case in point – each September it hosts Mistura, South America’s largest and most popular food festival. This year half a million hungry food enthusiasts are expected to visit Costa Verde de Magdalena for the ten-day event which kicks off September 5.

  • Worth a Thousand Words: Tips and Tricks to Get the Perfect Shots

    If a picture is worth a thousand words, the photos travelers take on their adventures through Peru are enough to fill the pages of many a novel. While we will undoubtedly remember their four-day trek to Machu Picchu, over time the details – like how the scenery looked under the cloudless, bright blue sky – can be forgotten. Thankfully photos take us back to those moments in time that might otherwise be lost.

    That’s why I recently sat with wildlife photographer Jeff Cremer of Rainforest Expeditions. He and his team not only take curious travelers to the Amazon, they also provide high-end equipment and training to travelers eager to learn how to snap shots like a pro. After all, pictures are one of the best souvenirs to bring home with you – why not have the best ones possible?

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    The Peruvian Power Lunch

    While it’s a developing country in many ways, Peru is still one of the most stable nations in Latin America. It’s economy has boomed over the last decade due in part to mining, produce exports and, of course, tourism. And, the middle class has grown from 25 percent of the total population to 60 percent during this time. This surge in the economy is attracting outside investors who want to build relationships with Andean corporations. For this reason, it’s beneficial for foreign business leaders to know the basics for a successful meal and a deal during their time in Peru.

  • Treatment for Altitude Sickness

    Standing before Machu Picchu, overlooking the goliath Incan civilization built entirely by hand 600 years ago is breathtaking for most travelers lucky enough to set their eyes on it. It takes travelers’ breath away, not only because of it’s size, complexity, beauty and history, but also because it sits at about 8,000 feet (2,500m) above sea level. Here the air is thin, leaving visitors gasping for oxygen and worse.

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    Clicking with Coffee: The Best Cafes to Plug In and Stay Connected

    A few weeks ago I found myself in between Internet service providers. In a past life, this is something I could have put up with thanks to uncapped amounts of internet on my phone and at my workplace. But in Peru, my phone plan doesn’t offer unlimited data and I work from the big red couch in my living room from which I am currently sitting. A few days in and I realized I wasn’t only missing out on social media, Netflix and cat videos, but also the important stuff like being able to contact family and friends via mobile messaging apps and doing the research and writing I needed to to bring home the bacon. Instead of toughing it out, I gave in, packed up and trekked to several of the Internet cafes dotting Lima’s zig-zagging streets.

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    From Cell Phones to SIM Cards: Staying Connected in Peru

    Whether you’re traveling for business or for leisure, there’s something special about having access to emails as they come in, maps and GPS to get around town, search engines to find restaurant recommendations, messaging and social media apps to stay in touch with friends and family back home, and a phone to make calls. Smart phones, of course, make this possible, but if your mobile plan doesn’t include free-of-charge international roaming, your trip to Peru could get a whole lot more expensive.

    But, making calls and surfing the web on your cell phone in Peru is easy and pretty cheap with a little planning and patience.

  • Around Peru in 8 Dishes

    Peru is the “gastronomic mecca” of the world. That, according to The Economist, a current affairs magazine that covers culture, politics and news. The prestigious periodical just wrote an in-depth piece about the somewhat recent Peruvian food debut onto the world-side stage.

    Perhaps it’s the eclectic blend of flavors from the sea, the sierra and the selva, or maybe it’s the fusion of multi-cultural flavors alongside native ingredients. Whatever it is, Peru is in the spotlight and now its haute cuisine is even being exported abroad and served up eateries across the globe.

    While traveling throughout each region (the coast, the mountains and the jungle) is the ideal way to taste each distinct dish, there may be a faster, easier way to savor the extensive menu. Until recently, Lima was just a layover city, a place for tourists to lie their heads before heading to Cusco and the Incan ruins of Machu Picchu. But now some 75,000 visitors stop in the capital city each year just to tickle their taste buds. If you plan on being among them, you are in store for a treat. 

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    Shopping for Lima’s Treasures from the Past

    A knickknack for grandma; a t-shirt for dad; a handful of key chains for the coworkers; and of course a bounty for yourself. Shopping is one of many vacation pastimes, but when in Lima there’s no reasoan to limit it solely to souvenir shops or the Inka Market. Sometimes, venturing beyond the obvious places can mean finding a unique treasure that has more meaning and a better back story than Peruvian-themed shot glasses or woven llama magnets.

  • Photo: Philippa Kikelly

    7 Tips for Seeing Peru Solo

    “To awaken quite alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world,” penned renowned travel writer Freya Stark in her 1932 book Baghdad Sketches.

    I can attest to this. I just completed my very first solo adventure last month, though I will admit, it was less “pleasant sensation” and more terrifying fear that rattled my nerves; at least in the days leading up to the trip.

    While I was nervous, the experience was one I can only call amazing. Going it alone meant not only seeing I wanted to see, when I wanted to see it but also getting to eat at this great hole-in-the-wall multiple times and going to bed at 7 p.m. one night after an exhausting day sightseeing.

    With its sweeping vistas, rich history and diverse terrain Peru is the perfect place to explore on your own.

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    Peru on a Plate: Around the World in Eight Dishes

    The Spanish may have been the first to emigrate to Peru, but they certainly weren’t the last. Perhaps it’s the eternal spring along the coast, or maybe its the rich history and culture that draw the international crowd. Whatever it is, people from all over the globe have been leaving their native lands and calling Peru home for more than half a millennium and with each group comes their traditions, their culture and, of course, their food. 

  • 5 Top Beaches in Peru

    Peru receives international acclaim for its man-made mysteries – primarily Machu Picchu and the Nazca Lines – but perhaps one of its equally alluring destinations wasn’t manufactured by hand.

    Peru’s beaches stretch more than 1,400 miles (2,250 km) down a sprawling coastline that kisses the Pacific Ocean. At nearly double the length of California’s famous seaside, Peru offers travelers a varied experience – from luxurious resorts to surfing Meccas to playful penguins.

  • Carnival: Peru’s Top Party Hot Spots

    From Italy to the Caribbean and even the United States (Mardi Gras), Carnival is celebrated in practically every region of the world with Catholic roots. The celebration traditionally falls in the days preceding Ash Wednesday, which marks the start of Lent, a period of 40 days where practicing Catholics typically abstain from parties and rich foods, while engaging in fasting and other activities viewed as pious. Historians believe this is where Carnival came into play.

    In the days leading up to Lent, all those rich foods – including the stockpiles of alcohol – needed to be spent and what better way than throwing a huge block party to get rid of it all (it’s like eating a box of brownies smothered in ice cream before starting a new diet).

    When thinking of Carnival in South America, the first vision that likely comes to mind is scantily clad women costumed in elaborately ornate headpieces Samba-ing their way through Rio de Janiero. While true for Brazil, the Portuguese-speaking nation isn’t the only place to get a piece of the Carnival action; Peru has a few parties all its own.

  • Photo: CREES

    Biking through the Cloud Forest

    Certainly one of my favorite ecosystems, full of orchids, ferns, colorful birds, waterfalls and other amazing flora and fauna. From all the places I’ve been to, the Manu Road has always been the most challenging. From the highlands it takes you deep into the forest. But biking this one-way road full of cliffs is even more challenging. Are you brave enough to take on this adventure?

  • Pachacamac and Huacas in Lima

    If you are in the country for business and don’t have enough time to visit Machu Picchu, you can explore many archaeological sites in Lima known as Huacas, a Quechua word which refers to any sacred object or place. The National Culture Institute registered 250 archeological sites across main districts of the city. These three are my favorite: 

  • The Magic Water Circuit

    The Park of the Reserve, located in downtown Lima, became an important tourism attraction after the municipal government transformed it into a colorful experience of water and lights. There are 13 fountains in the park and the largest one is called Magic Fountain. With its 80 m in height it is also considered the “World’s largest fountain complex in a public park” by the Guinness Book Of World Records.

  • The Best Restaurant in Latin America

    The folks behind The World’s 50 Best Restaurants – an annual snapshot of the world’s best restaurants based on a taste buds of internationally recognized food experts – created a Latin American spin off which includes South America, Central America and the Caribbean region. This year, the ceremony took place in Lima. The excitement was even greater when they announced 1st place. The prestigious title went to the famous Peruvian restaurant Astrid & Gastón.

  • Photo: Pirqa

    Rock and Wall Climbing in Peru

    Bouldering, indoor, free rock, trad rock, solo and alpine climbing … I still get confused with all these names. I’ve only tried  bouldering and indoor climbing, but they both were fun and physically demanding. I thought you need to be extremely strong but I was wrong. It is not all about the strength. Balance, creativity and control play a very important role as well.

    Although this activity has been present in Perú, specially in the Andes, it has grown in popularity over the last years. Here I’ll share two places to practice this sport in Lima and the northern highlands.

  • Photo: Yogasana

    Best Yoga Studios in Lima

    If you live in Lima or you’re just visiting the city, here are some good schools to practice the ancient tradition of yoga. They all have experienced teachers and an amazing atmosphere that attracts experienced practitioners and beginners.

  • Organic Shops and Restaurants in Lima

    People around the world are getting more conscious about their diet and are eating healthier. Lima is also part of this movement and over the last years more options for quality, healthy, organic and vegetarian food have emerged.

    Here is a list of my favorite places in Lima with healthy options:

  • 72 Hours in Puno

    The city of Puno, located at the shore of Lake Titicaca (the highest navigable lake in the world), is a gateway to fascinating cultures and breathtaking Altiplano landscapes. The city that boarders Bolivia is also a Ramsar Site (wetland of international importance) due to its large population of water birds.

  • Photo: Calle del Medio Restaurant

    A Night Out in Cusco

    I recommend you start your night at Calle del Medio Restaurant located in front of the Cathedral in the Plaza de Armas (Main Square). From the moment this place opened its doors, it was destined to become one of the city’s favorites. This might be because of its colorful and cozy atmosphere, but also because of its signature cuisine made of Andean ingredients, such as Alpaca brochette and Tartare de trucha (Trout tartar).

  • Photo: Ayahuasca

    Trendy Bars in Lima

    I feel my city is getting more and more exciting each year. Now that winter has arrived and people can’t admit the summer party is over, bars start opening their doors, some for the very first time.

    Check out the hottest new bars and some that have already become classics in the city of kings:

  • Mario Testino´s Permanent Exhibition in Lima

    As I said before, Lima is becoming a vibrant city with many things happening around.

    Since last July a restored 19th century mansion located in Lima´s bohemian district of Barranco has hosted MATE – Asociación Mario Testino. MATE is a non-profit organization founded by the famous photographer Mario Testino, which promotes artistic and cultural exchange among local and international artists.

  • Discovering the Moche Route

    Once I heard that the best time to be had when traveling is when you wake up before anyone else to enjoy an unforgettable sunrise. When I did this in Chaparri, Moche Sacred Mountain, and I saw it reddened by the sun, hidden in the fog, I understood why shamans still invoke it in their sessions and why the pre-Incan civilization Moches did too.

  • Little Known Ways to Trek the Andes

    Getting a massage after six hours of walking, arriving at the campsite with an amazing view of the mountains, taking a hot shower followed by a delightful dinner made out of local ingredients and falling asleep on a comfortable feather pillow. Believe me, this is how you want to trek the Andes!

  • Photo: Joe N

    Surfing in Northern Peru

    Every year hundreds of surfers from around the world come to visit north and south coast of Peru, famous for its year-round warm water and uncrowded break points. But the surfing history in Peru began further back than you probably imagine.

  • Photo: Ashley

    5 Reasons to Love Peruvian Coffee

    Coffee? Dark, no sugar and a little milk please. I just can’t begin my day without a cup of good and tasty coffee. What about you? And what if it’s organic, fair trade and grown on the slopes of the Andes?

    Peru has become the main producer and exporter of organic coffee on the continent. Most of its beans (Arabica variety) grow in the Cloud Forest and on the small local farms.

  • Luxury Hotels in Cusco

    Cusco surprises me each time I visit it. Although I’ve lived in this vibrant city, I still discover new things each time I go back – new streets, restaurants, people. But in the last year, I’ve been noticing  colonial houses restored into luxury hotels. I’m inviting you to discover my favorite ones.

  • Mistura: The Largest Food Festival in Latin America

    Did you know that Lima hosts the largest gastronomy fair in South America called Mistura? Last September this iconic event attracted half a million visitors and this year they are expecting around one million!

    This 10-day fiesta welcomes cooks, bakers, street food vendors, sweet vendors,  restaurants, culinary institutes, patrons, and many more.

  • Recipe: Pallar by Gaston Acurio

    We usually provide our readers with inspiring travel tips in South America, but today, we are bringing Peru to your kitchen by giving you a gourmet recipe worth its cooking time.

    And if you call yourself a real food lover, then surely you have heard of Gaston Acurio, celebrity chef and ambassador to Peruvian cuisine. This recipe of the pallar dish (lima bean) is courtesy of one Acurio’s top franchises, Astrid y Gaston, known for its sophisticated yet laid back dishes and atmosphere.

  • How to Prepare Peruvian Ceviche

    There are a few theories about the origin of ceviche and its name but it seems that it originated more than 2,000 years ago among the indigenous groups of northern Peru, where the Moche culture was situated (Chiclayo and Trujillo). Nowadays it is prepared in many Latin American countries in a multitude of ways. But if you want to know how it’s served at the best cevicherias in Peru, get your pencil, paper and fish ready for a great recipe!

  • Enjoying Peruvian Gastronomy

    Over the last years, Peruvian gastronomy has become known worldwide. Many Peruvian entrepreneurs have opened restaurants abroad that immediately became famous, like if they had a secret formula. But why do people from different countries and of different tastes love this food so much?

  • Photo: Karina Dávila

    Whale Watching in Northern Peru

    If you are a nature lover and would like to observe some of the most amazing marine fauna, head to northern Peru. There you will be able to relax and recharge your batteries to continue the journey.

    Los Organos, located around 1200 km north of Lima, has a heavenly beach where you can surf and try local sea food. From August to October you can see Humpback Whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), which arrive in Peruvian waters for breeding and calving.

  • Photo: Thomas S.

    The History of Pisco

    Peruvian Pisco Sour is a national cocktail that you must try as soon as you arrive to Peru. It has become a welcome drink of our country. If you want a taste, you can also try a shot of its base liquor Quebranta Pisco.

    What is the history behind this Peruvian grape-based liquor?

  • Christmas in the Andes

    Even though the majority of Peruvians are Catholic, the Andean culture is still very present in people’s beliefs. This results in a blending of cultural and religious mythology that makes the culture very rich in traditions and holidays.

    Cuzco celebrates Christmas with Santuranticuy – one of the biggest arts and crafts fairs in Peru. Preparations for this fair start six months before Chirstmas. Hundreds of artisans gather in and around the main square with traditional crafts creating a very picturesque atmosphere. Some camp out the night before to guarantee a good spot to sell their wares.

  • Alternative Tours in Cusco

    If you are the type of traveler that likes to travel off the beaten path, here are some alternative tours in Cusco for you to explore.

    Land of the Yachaqs

    Yachaqs means Wise in Quechua, the language of the Incas. Less than two hours away from Cusco, in the Sacred Valley, there are communities that carry on the wisdom and way of life of Incan ancestors. You can visit eight of the many communities in the area and experience their traditions, agricultural and artisan techniques.

  • 24 hours in Lima

    Lima is a huge city with a population of almost 9 million “Limeños”. As in any big city there are interesting things happening all around. But where to go if you have a free day? Don’t worry, I will give you recommendations on culture, gastronomy, and nature that you can enjoy walking or by bike.

  • 3 Top Nature Destinations

    Peru is considered one of the most- biodiverse countries in the world with some unbeatable records such as number one in diversity of butterflies and number two on birds species. If you are a nature lover, Peru offers not only lively culture but unique experiences in diverse ecosytems.

  • Marathon in the Andes

    Have you ever run not to reach the finish line but to conquer one of the wonders of the world? If you answered no, this is your chance.

    Inca Trail Marathon and Races:

    Since 1998, a local tourism agency has organized the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu Marathon, which is a strenuous run over mountain terrain that takes you from 8,000 to 13,500 feet to reach the Lost City of the Incas. This is recommended for very experienced runners.

  • Q’eswachaca: The Inca’s Straw Bridge

    Every year, the Q`eswachaca bridge is rebuilt, keeping alive an Inca tradition. Building this bridge made out of Puna grassland, called Ichu, was the only way settlers could cross the rivers in their time. This used to be part of a network of bridges in the Cuzco region and now is the only one of its kind, which exists thanks to the local villagers.

  • Let’s Meet This Summer

    Coming soon to this exact spot, wearing nothing but words (and the occasional photo) and dedicated to bringing you all the ins and outs, tips and tidbits, hots and nots of South America… it’s our new blog! Now you’ll be able to stay in-the-know about sights to see, events to attend, food to eat, music to hear, ideas to share, and much more. Only the most blog-worthy info. Only in South America.

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