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  • Three Lunchtime Market Options in Santiago, Chile

    One of the main reasons we travel is to try foods from other countries. Coincidentally, all that sight seeing, museum hopping, checking out parks, long walks, photography tours and all the rest can leave you hungry as well. The main meal in Chile is often eaten at lunchtime, and there’s no better place than the few blocks surrounding the Cal y Canto Metro/Estación Mapocho in Santiago to see what’s on people’s plates come noon (or two, the preferred lunchtime). If you’re feeling peckish, here are three markets, all within a few blocks of each other for you to try.

  • How To Add a Peruvian Twist to Any Holiday Meal

    It’s that time of year again. Whether you celebrate Thanksgiving (Nov. 27), Hanukkah (Dec. 16-24), Yule (Dec. 21), Nochebuena (Dec. 24), Christmas (Dec. 25), Kwanzaa (Dec. 26-Jan.1) or something else entirely, chances are sometime within the next month, you, your family and your friends will gather ’round the dinner table to express your blessings and share a meal together. And while tradition – I’m talking foods like turkey to latkes and everything in between – is nice, sometimes it’s worth spicing up the holiday spread. 

  • Photo: Kevin Raub

    Pop-Up Pizza in Rio de Janiero

    São Paulo has always been Brazil’s pizza city; in fact, it ranks right up there with New York, New Haven, Naples or any other of the world’s best places for a little dough, tomato sauce and cheese. Rio de Janeiro, on the other hand, is not a pizza city. Not at all. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t have great pizza.

  • Chile Picante Restaurant: A Surprise in Puerto Montt

    Puerto Montt, one of the most important ports in Chile, has a gorgeous coastline, and great access to both the lakes region and journeys through the fjords of Chile as well as the large island of Chiloé. As a port town, it’s mainly a workhorse for Chile, and you can see this reflected in some of the industrial areas, and even in the food offerings. Food is cooked traditionally (and plentifully), especially in the market area of Angelmó, where a set of restaurants on stilts lays down giant plates of fried reineta (pomfret), steaming bowls of caldillo de congrio (conger eel soup), and other Chilean specialties. But what might surprise you is that Puerto Montt also has a restaurant for those looking for a more delicate touch, foodies in search of what’s cool and new and traditional all at the same time. 

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    A Chocolate Factory in Peru that Would Make Willy Wonka Proud

    It’s been 50 years since Roald Dahl penned the story of the penniless Charlie Bucket getting his hands on the winning chocolate bar in his 1964 book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. The golden ticket, which was tucked inside the chocolate bar, gave Charlie and four other kids access to a world most children can only dream of – chocolate rivers surrounded by “eatable marshmallow pillows, likable wallpaper [...], hot ice creams for cold days, cows that give chocolate milk, fizzy lifting drinks [and] square sweets that look round.”

    That book, which Hollywood later turned into two movies has inspired anyone with a sweet tooth to dream big. That’s why I decided I had to celebrate Dahl’s semi-centennial with a trip to Peru’s very own chocolate factory – the ChocoMuseo.

  • Photo: Embratur

    Weekend Getaway: Recife

    Most tourists to the Northeast capital of Recife – outside of its spectacular Carnaval, anyway – see little more than what flies by their taxi windows on the way to the city’s far more picturesque and tranquil colonial neighbor of Olinda – located six miles north – Recife itself is not without its charms. While Brazil’s sixth biggest city (population: 3.7 million) can be a gritty and grimy mess, its culture, historic areas, restaurants and urban beaches are worth a day or two of your time. For those interested in visiting a living, breathing Brazilian city going about its business, an idea that provided the focal point of Kleber Mendonça Filho’s 2012 haunting indie hit Neighboring Sounds, Recife deserves a chance. 

  • Microbrews in Chile

    Chile, the long, skinny country that takes up much of the west coast of South America, is perfectly situated for wine. It’s the place of the rediscovery of the long-thought-lost Carmenere grape, and a country that bases much of its export economy on Chilean wine. Certainly no visit to Chile is complete without a vineyard visit, or at the very least, some wine tasting. But beer lovers need not fear, there is plenty of cerveza to go around.

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