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  • Photo: Not Just Another Ceviche Recipe

    Not Just Another Ceviche Recipe

    If you’ve been hearing a lot about ceviche these days, you’re not alone. The traditional, spicy, citrusy, raw fish dish has been at the vanguard of the surge popularity surrounding Peruvian cuisine.

  • Photo: Nine Peruvian Dishes You Need To Know

    Nine Peruvian Dishes You Need To Know

    If you wanted to learn as much as you could about Peruvian cuisine in only nine dishes, what would they be? It’s okay if you don’t know the answer, the nice people at Thrillist have done the research for you. It’s a nice way to learn a bit before you plan your Peruvian vacation.

  • Photo: A Chef Comes Home To Lima

    A Chef Comes Home To Lima

    Peru native Manuel Villacorta recently returned to Lima to investigate the city’s latest culinary developments for The Huffington Post.

  • Classic Peruvian Ceviche And Its Contemporary Counterparts

    by Erika Schuler

    Ceviche is getting a lot of attention right now, but for us Peruvians, it’s hardly new. In fact, it’s part of our prehispanic culture. Raw, fishy, spicy, light and delicious.

    Mexico, Ecuador, Chile and some other countries have their own version, including some with tomato (yuck) but in Peru it’s pretty straight forward; it´s all about the fish.

  • Photo: Gallery Peru

    A Foodie’s Photo Gallery Peru

    Professional food photographer Matt Armendariz recently visited Peru with fellow foodies Gaby Dalkin and Adam Pearson. While Matt certainly captured the mouth-watering beauty of Peruvian cuisine, he didn’t limit his subjects to what was on the plate. Matt also snapped a cornucopia of Peruvian ingredients, where they’re grown and the breath-taking Peruvian landscape. We hope you enjoy Matt’s work, it’s clear he does.

  • Photo: Enjoy Peruvian Food

    Enjoy Peruvian Food at 30,000 Feet

    LAN Peru is giving travelers who have had Peru on their foodie destination radar another incentive to book that trip sooner than later. For a limited time, LAN Peru is helping travelers start their culinary experience the minute they step onboard by serving iconic, traditional Peruvian cuisine on the in-flight menu from Los Angeles, New York, Miami to Peru. Enjoy Peruvian Food

  • Mistura’s Greatest Hits

    by Erika Schuler

    Lima, September.
    An enormous grey blanket looms over the city, but there hasn’t been any rain. Some say Lima is gloomy in winter. But if you look closer, the city is having a party.

    Mistura’s Greatest Hits, Mistura is on.

  • The Corks Pop, and the War Is Declared

    Okay, you’ve got four sommeliers, 32 of the best Chilean wines and eight hours. We need you to build a Chilean-inspired wine bar, and be ready to serve over 500 people this evening.
    Oh, and this is a competition. There are three other teams with exactly the same assignment. Yes, it’s going to be challenging, but the reward is pretty sweet; LAN Airlines will fly the winning team in our Premium Business class for a once in a lifetime trip to Chile.
    Ready? Go!

  • LAN Airlines and TAM Airlines Opened the Largest VIP Lounge in South America! couldn’t have said it better – our new VIP Lounge launched this April 2015 is a physical representation of the diverse cultures of our region, South America.

    Located on the 4th and 5th floors of the western sector of Santiago’s Arturo Merino Benitez International Airport in Chile, this space is much  more than just a VIP lounge. Here are some fun facts and main features of our sleek new space in SCL:


  • Take A Bite Out of the Big Apple in Brazil

    São Paulo is often called the New York City of South America, so it makes sense that there seems to be a restaurant trend in the last few years of well-known New York City restaurants opening up in São Paulo, many of those being their first foray into the international market. And why not? Both cities are worldwide gastronomic hubs; they share an eat-or-be-eaten lifestyle; and both cities never close. They might as well have dinner together, too.

    Here is our three favorite spots to take a bite out of the Big Apple in Brazil:

  • The French Café Boom in Santiago

    Got an early morning in Santiago and want to start it off with flaky pastry, or some crusty bread? Or you’ve already had a hotel breakfast but walking around downtown Santiago and beyond has got you hankering for a mid-morning snack? The French are masters of pastry, and whether it’s a second breakfast or an afternoon pick-me-up, Santiago’s many French bakery/cafés have got you covered, from downtown, up through Bellas Artes, Providencia, in Las Condes and Vitacura. A croissant and a café au lait, or your drink of choice is never too far away at one of these French or French-inspired cafés.

  • Photo: SubAstor1

    Beyond the Caipirinha: Meet Brazil’s Other Best Cocktail

    No doubt due to an insufferable hangover, most folks already know that Brazil’s national cocktail is the caipirinha, made from the national spirit, cachaça, along with sugar and fresh limes, but what else is there to drink?

    When you are ready to shake things up a bit, branch out and ask the bartender for Brazil’s next best cocktail, the Caju Amigo (Cashew Fruit Friend) – every bit as Brazilian as the caipirinha but not nearly as famous.

  • Photo: Pudim de Leite

    Brazil’s Best Sweet Treats

    If you have a sweet tooth – you know who you are – than Brazil is going to knock you out. Some foreigners even complain that some of Brazil’s most beloved desserts are just too sweet but no self-respecting sugar addict would ever say such a blasphemous thing, now would they?

    Brazilian sweets come in all shapes and sizes and are available everywhere from the streets and beaches to padarias (bakeries) to dessert specialty cafes – you are never far from a sugar coma – and owe a debt to combined influences from Portugal (anything with eggs as the main ingredient!) to West Africa (certain pastries and the like).

    Here’s how to get your sugar high in Brazil!

  • Ice Cream Cravings in Colombia

    It may be frigid across most of the northern hemisphere, but it’s always ice cream weather in Colombia – which could explain why the locals are always hungry for ice cream. It’s possible to find delicious dairy treats on just about any street corner, though if you’re looking for something extra-special, you may want to check out one of Colombia’s several excellent chains. Rest assured, though, it’s almost impossible to go wrong with ice cream here.

  • Sunday Funday in Liberdade

    São Paulo’s Liberdade neighborhood is the epicenter of what is said to be the largest Japanese population outside Japan. Brazil is home to an estimated 1.5 million Japanese-Brazilians, many of them living right here in this bustling neighborhood 1km south of Centro, with a tad bit of Chinese and Korean sprinkled in for good measure (some of the city’s best Chinese restaurants are here and South Korea’s Melona honeydew melon-flavored popsicles are wildly popular in the streets as well).

  • Photo: Elena

    A Sip of Summer: The 5 Must-Try Drinks in Peru

    Limonada Clasica

    On a hot summer day, few drinks replenish your body quite like an ice-cold limonada. Made from water, sugar and Peruvian limes, this tart beverage will quench your thirst and cool you off like none other. The best part about the limonada is that most restaurants make it to order, so you can get more or less sugar depending on your sweet tooth.

  • Photo: Mocoto

    A Trip to Mocotó

    It came as no surprise to anyone that 34-year-old Rodrigo Oliveira from São Paulo’s Mocotó restaurant was named Chef of the Year in Veja‘s annual Comer & Beber issue for 2014-15, a bit of a gastronomic Bible for foodies in the city. The guy is humble, immediately likable, soft-spoken, good-looking, mild-mannered and knows his way around a kitchen. But what he has pulled off at Mocotó, and the more upscale Esquina Mocotó next door (which took home honors for Best Brazilian Restaurant, incidentally), is truly remarkable. 

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    Ají Peppers: The Secret is in the Sauce

    It´s no secret: Peru is all the rage and Peruvian food, which is quite literally on the tip of everyone´s tongues, has taken center stage. What sets the nation´s dishes apart from the rest of the world is as much the preparation as it is the fresh ingredients. After all, without this special combination, lomo saltado is nothing more than steak and potatoes. One ingredient that really brings even the simplest foods to life is ají, a type of chili pepper endlessly used in everything from chifa to ceviche. It´s been used as long as people have been cooking in the country currently known as Peru (we´re talking about 7,000 years), so the trial by fire (pun intended) period is over. Peruvians have the ají, and how to use it, down to a science.

  • Photo: Troy Tolley, RPP and Toshiyuki IMAI (left to right)

    Cheers to National Chilcano Week

    Argentina and Chile are world-renowned for their wine. In Brazil cachaça, made from sugarcane, is king. For Colombia, the liquor of choice is an anise-flavored aguardiente. And in Peru, our national trago is a grape-derived brandy called pisco.

    Peruvians often add a little local flair to traditional cocktails by holding the rum (in say a mojito) or forgoing the tequila (in a margarita), opting instead for a pour of pisco. And while this Peruvianizes just about any drink, it’s not nearly as authentic as one of Peru’s favorite cocktails, the chilcano.

  • What to do in January: Buenos Aires

    Lots of travelers plan trips to Argentina in January – a few weeks that happen to be the hottest (and quietest) of the year in Buenos Aires. But there are benefits to spending a few days in the capital city this month: since many locals are away on vacation, there’s lighter traffic and shorter wait times at popular restaurants. Here, a few ideas of where to go and what to do in January to take advantage of an emptier-than-usual city.

  • Photo: By Carla Peirano, in Magazine Photos by: Stefan Schmeling Young, sophisticated and laid-back. That’s Vila Madalena, São Paulo’s hippest neighborhood, a vibrant place where fashion, art and design co-exist with graffiti and a stylish crowd. It’s a sunny Saturday afternoon in winter here in São Paulo, Brazil. I can observe everything and everyone from the strategically located Amüse Food Store, on the corner of Girassol and Aspicuelta. While I wait for my iced tea, I observe the passers-by, most of them women united by their fashion sense and their desire to shop. You sense a certain self-satisfaction in the way they walk. Unlike other São Paulo neighborhoods, this neighborhood in the western part of the city is fashionably chic, but in an unpretentious way. Folks around here obviously pay attention to their look, but there’s a personal stamp in the way they dress. It’s quite different from what you see on Rua Oscar Freire, for instance, where the fashion parade is legendary and most pedestrians look like they stepped straight out of a fashion magazine and into this endless metropolis. It’s no accident that style lovers flock to the winding streets of Vila Madalena. This bohemian neighborhood began its transformation in the 1970s, when young students of art and fashion began to rent and share large houses. Over time, these homes were converted into art galleries, studios and casual restaurants, a chaotic and spontaneous process that nurtured the spirit so evident in the neighborhood today: bohemian, vibrant and full of color. Welcome to Vila Madalena A style all its own. That’s what you’ll find on the streets of Vila Madalena. It’s the perfect place for folks who want to be seen as well as those who would rather people watch, taking in trends, styles and bold statements in clothing and colors. When I stroll the streets here, I am constantly looking around, admiring these well-turned-out fashionistas. I’m struck by the way they’ve managed to achieve such a casually sophisticated look. It seems spontaneous, unplanned and, as result, totally authentic. As I sip on my iced tea, I talk with some girls who are next to me. They tell me they’ve come on a shopping tour of the local stores. They share some addresses and recommendations that I try to memorize as though they were secret formulas. They tell me that my best bet is to start my tour on the nearby street of Girassol. They leave with complicit smiles, as though they’ve helped out someone in dire need. I’ve finished my tea, so there’s nothing left for me to do but immerse myself in Vila Madalena. I walk down Girassol, and before long, I come across Uma, a surprisingly sophisticated store, with a collection dominated by clear and simple lines. Suddenly, I feel like I’m shopping in Tokyo, not São Paulo. I keep walking until I reach the store of Juliana Bicudo, a local shoemaker who designs handmade footwear. Her eponymous shop is both elegant and colorful, and the collection is divine. I adore these shoes because they can be worn to formal and informal events alike, depending on the rest of your outfit. She even has a wedding line with custom designs to accommodate the style of each bride. Crossing the street, I encounter the metallic blue suede and classic lines offered by Luiza Perea, another gifted shoe designer. This shop looks more like a living room. It’s a real delight. I’m barely through the door before they invite me to sit down and have something to drink. The designs are terrific. You can really see the dedication and care in the creations. The two women who make the shoes are usually in the store, so any questions you have can be answered by the shoemakers themselves.   Unlike other São Paulo neighborhoods, Vila Madalena is all about fashion but in an unpretentious way. Peixaria, a stylish but authentic restaurant, offers a taste of the beach in the middle 
of the city. Style on the Sand My tour continues. I soon come to La Cervecería, where the fun atmosphere, conversation and clinking of beer mugs is impossible to resist. When I’ve finished my chope (draft beer), I leave on the heels of two attractive women. They tell their friend who’s parking her car that they’ll meet her at Mocambo. I wonder what kind of clothing they sell there. As my imagination is busy at work, I arrive at a tiny space dedicated to… tattoos? I’m a little disconcerted. All of a sudden, I’m surrounded by rough-looking types straight out of a motorcycle magazine. The owners tell me they only do custom tattoos, one-of-a-kind designs for each client. Maybe that’s why the cool girls who led me here are so excited about a place that seems tailor-made for tough guys. In the small, dark space, they give me some more tips to continue my tour. One of their more interesting suggestions is Chapéu, a heavenly bathing-suit shop. I’m told it’s one of the most popular stores of its kind in São Paulo. And in a country where beach life is an institution, that really says something. The collection of bathing suits is varied and elegant. The designs and styles seem intended for a social event rather than the beach. I envy the women who can pull them off, but I’m afraid that on other Latin American beaches, they’d be more cause for gawking than admiration. I’m fairly certain that you have to be Brazilian – and be in Brazil – to wear them. I leave Chapéu and head down Rua Mourato Coelho. I spot the window of the shop Tonus, and I’m transfixed. I decide to go in. The clerks explain the ideas behind the designs. The back part of the shop features the workshop where designer Sergio Tonus comes up with his creations. Tonus himself explains the production process to me. His designs from the shop’s nine years of existence are carefully displayed on hangers.   The many worlds of Vila Madalena: 
tattoos at Mocambo and rockabilly style 
at Barberia 9 de Julho. With no set destination, I wander through Vila Madalena. Eventually, I come to Barberia 9 de Julho, a barbershop with the air of a rockabilly club. The parking spaces outside are taken up entirely by motorcycles. There’s also a dog sporting a bandana, patiently waiting for his owner. I continue along with no end in mind, accompanied by the impressive graffiti that adorns the walls, shops selling Japanese products, ceramics studios, art galleries and a few eateries. I’m hungry, but all the clothing and design stores keep distracting me. One highlight is the shop owned by Fernanda Yamamoto, who specializes in creations made with patterned fabrics. Best of all, there’s an outlet section with clothing from past seasons at reasonable prices. Another great place is Trash Chic, a mix between a fashion museum and a Buddhist temple. They even have a small altar in honor of Coco Chanel. The collection includes pieces by Valentino, Nina Ricci, Prada and Chanel. It’s the finest vintage store I’ve seen in my life. Finally, I end up at Peixaria. This beach-inspired restaurant is full of grilled seafood, endless caipirinhas and infectiously cheerful people. It turns out to be an excellent choice and a great way to end my adventures in Vila Madalena. in    

    A Fashionista in São Paulo

    By Carla Peirano, in Magazine
    Photos by: Stefan Schmeling

    Young, sophisticated and laid-back. That’s Vila Madalena, São Paulo’s hippest neighborhood, a vibrant place where fashion, art and design co-exist with graffiti and a stylish crowd.

  • Photo: Kevin Raub

    Weekend Getaway: Fortaleza

    The Northeastern Brazilian state of Ceará, like Bahia to the southeast, is one of the country’s dreamy states: Endless summers, endless beaches, bottomless cocktails and bottomless sunsets, all nicely packaged by a laid-back population that subscribes 24/7 to the tropical lifestyle. The capital, Fortaleza, is jumping off point for some of Brazil’s most cinematic beach destinations – Jericoacoara, Canoa Quebrada – but it’s no flyby travel hub. Fortaleza offers plenty of worthwhile recreational distractions with the added bonus of big city infrastructure (population: 3.6 million) – and a beautiful bronzed population at that!

  • The Fruits of Chilean Summer

    One of the joys of traveling is trying out local tastes and traditions. Chile has many main dishes and drinks both alcoholic and non-alcoholic that are part and parcel of summer. For example, the stewy potage of porotos granados, with corn, squash and beans is typical of summer, as those ingredients come in to season. Mote con huesillo, the sweet peach punch with wheat kernels and reconstituted, dried peaches, and cola de mono, a sweet café-con-leche concoction made with pisco are also popular at this time of year. But if you want to get a little more basic, head to the markets (or supermarket) and check out some of the fruit that comes into season as if to remind us that the long days of summer are just ahead. 

  • Photo: Ulrich Peters

    Brazil’s Top 5 Urban Markets

    From the bustling souks of Morocco to the sophisticated Ferry Building in San Francisco, urban markets are always a requisite stop on the tourist trail. There’s something so overwhelming about all the sights, sounds and smells of a foreign land’s shopping and Brazil is no exception. Some of South America’s biggest and best markets are here, ready to assault your senses with a kaleidoscopic cornucopia of everything from exotic tropical fruits to regional handicrafts. Here are my five favorite!

  • Three Lunchtime Market Options in Santiago, Chile

    One of the main reasons we travel is to try foods from other countries. Coincidentally, all that sight seeing, museum hopping, checking out parks, long walks, photography tours and all the rest can leave you hungry as well. The main meal in Chile is often eaten at lunchtime, and there’s no better place than the few blocks surrounding the Cal y Canto Metro/Estación Mapocho in Santiago to see what’s on people’s plates come noon (or two, the preferred lunchtime). If you’re feeling peckish, here are three markets, all within a few blocks of each other for you to try.

  • How To Add a Peruvian Twist to Any Holiday Meal

    It’s that time of year again. Whether you celebrate Thanksgiving (Nov. 27), Hanukkah (Dec. 16-24), Yule (Dec. 21), Nochebuena (Dec. 24), Christmas (Dec. 25), Kwanzaa (Dec. 26-Jan.1) or something else entirely, chances are sometime within the next month, you, your family and your friends will gather ’round the dinner table to express your blessings and share a meal together. And while tradition – I’m talking foods like turkey to latkes and everything in between – is nice, sometimes it’s worth spicing up the holiday spread. 

  • Photo: Kevin Raub

    Pop-Up Pizza in Rio de Janeiro

    São Paulo has always been Brazil’s pizza city; in fact, it ranks right up there with New York, New Haven, Naples or any other of the world’s best places for a little dough, tomato sauce and cheese. Rio de Janeiro, on the other hand, is not a pizza city. Not at all. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t have great pizza.

  • Chile Picante Restaurant: A Surprise in Puerto Montt

    Puerto Montt, one of the most important ports in Chile, has a gorgeous coastline, and great access to both the lakes region and journeys through the fjords of Chile as well as the large island of Chiloé. As a port town, it’s mainly a workhorse for Chile, and you can see this reflected in some of the industrial areas, and even in the food offerings. Food is cooked traditionally (and plentifully), especially in the market area of Angelmó, where a set of restaurants on stilts lays down giant plates of fried reineta (pomfret), steaming bowls of caldillo de congrio (conger eel soup), and other Chilean specialties. But what might surprise you is that Puerto Montt also has a restaurant for those looking for a more delicate touch, foodies in search of what’s cool and new and traditional all at the same time. 

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    A Chocolate Factory in Peru that Would Make Willy Wonka Proud

    It’s been 50 years since Roald Dahl penned the story of the penniless Charlie Bucket getting his hands on the winning chocolate bar in his 1964 book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. The golden ticket, which was tucked inside the chocolate bar, gave Charlie and four other kids access to a world most children can only dream of – chocolate rivers surrounded by “eatable marshmallow pillows, likable wallpaper […], hot ice creams for cold days, cows that give chocolate milk, fizzy lifting drinks [and] square sweets that look round.”

    That book, which Hollywood later turned into two movies has inspired anyone with a sweet tooth to dream big. That’s why I decided I had to celebrate Dahl’s semi-centennial with a trip to Peru’s very own chocolate factory – the ChocoMuseo.

  • Photo: Embratur

    Weekend Getaway: Recife

    Most tourists to the Northeast capital of Recife – outside of its spectacular Carnaval, anyway – see little more than what flies by their taxi windows on the way to the city’s far more picturesque and tranquil colonial neighbor of Olinda – located six miles north – Recife itself is not without its charms. While Brazil’s sixth biggest city (population: 3.7 million) can be a gritty and grimy mess, its culture, historic areas, restaurants and urban beaches are worth a day or two of your time. For those interested in visiting a living, breathing Brazilian city going about its business, an idea that provided the focal point of Kleber Mendonça Filho’s 2012 haunting indie hit Neighboring Sounds, Recife deserves a chance. 

  • Microbrews in Chile

    Chile, the long, skinny country that takes up much of the west coast of South America, is perfectly situated for wine. It’s the place of the rediscovery of the long-thought-lost Carmenere grape, and a country that bases much of its export economy on Chilean wine. Certainly no visit to Chile is complete without a vineyard visit, or at the very least, some wine tasting. But beer lovers need not fear, there is plenty of cerveza to go around.

  • Lima Cool

    By Marco Aviles, in Magazine
    Photos by: Daniel Silva

    A treasure-filled bookstore only open in the afternoon, the town’s second-best cebichería and an art space where pop reigns supreme – come along on an alternate route through Peru’s ever-changing capital.

  • A Day North of the Mapocho River in Santiago, Chile

    Tourists visiting Santiago usually divide their time among uptown, downtown and out of town, where out of town includes the wine country, the coast, the mountains, or a combination of all three. But there’s another way to think of the city, which is to use the Mapocho River—which runs down from Cajón de Maipo through the city—as a dividing line between north and south.

  • La Floresta Gets Café-Trendy in Quito

    I grew up in Quito and then left at adolescence. And while I was gone (about 15 years), it changed monumentally. Almost a million more people moved into the city, for one thing.  It doubled in size. Back then, in the 80s, it was a small town. It felt like it, at least. Of course, it has always been the capital of the country, but there was absolutely no traffic throughout its northern half, where I lived at the time (I can’t say the same, today). And there were virtually no trendy cafés.

  • How to Eat Breakfast like a Colombian

    The US gets a lot of (well-deserved) attention for its stellar breakfast food, but Colombia knows how to hold its own when it comes to the most important meal of the day.

    From the bustling central cities to the laid-back Caribbean coast to the rural campesino communities in the south, everyone stocks up on energy food – and, of course, lots of carbs – before heading out to greet the day. Any Colombian will tell you that food here varies immensely by region – and the battles between different areas for culinary supremacy are fierce. Each part of the country has its own spin on the beloved arepa, its own fruit juices, its own cheese, bread, potato dishes, rice – you get the picture. This is just one of the many things that makes traveling throughout Colombia such an adventure: you’re always trying new flavors and dishes, no matter where you go!

    It could take pages to go through all of the options available for morning foodies, but here’s a quick primer on a few of the most typical Colombian breakfast dishes, ranging from the positively mouthwatering to the ones that might make you wish you’d never gotten out of bed. Of course, all of them come with a fresh-brewed cup of Colombian coffee!

  • Photo: Embratur

    Weekend Getaway: Salvador

    Easily Brazil’s richest capital for history and culture, Salvador is the big and bountiful jewel of Bahia, arguably Brazil’s most vivid and beautiful state. The city’s history, steeped heavily in Afro-Brazilian culture, manifests itself in many ways, namely in the colorful colonial center of Pelourinho and, most importantly (in my humble opinion, anyway!), the food, but also in the religion (Candomblé is strongest here), the sport (this capoeira central) and the deeply African-influenced habits, customs and appearances of the population. A weekend in Salvador is a journey through all that makes up the diverse recipe called Brazil in one immensely cinematic city. And just to spice things up a bit, everything here is hot – the people, the weather and the food.

  • Best Indian Food in Santiago

    In recent years, Santiago has seen changes in immigration, which can be seen on the street where, for example, certain neighborhoods attract stores catering to specific nationalities, such as a strip of shops along the Plaza de Armas selling Peruvian products and courier services to Peru. We’ve also seen a change in culinary offerings from other countries in Latin America, but since the early 2000s, from considerably farther afield. This is due not only to immigration, but also to increased Chilean interest in trying foods from other cultures. One of those is Indian. We still don’t get restaurants specific to different states of India, but if you’re looking for something a bit more saucy, spicy and international than the usual Chilean offerings, the following Indian restaurants are a good place to start.

  • Eating Brunch in Santiago, Chile

    Chile’s gastronomic scene is hopping, with new ingredients, and new spins on old ingredients. And now, a new (to Chile) spin on a meal itself, the introduction of brunch to the Saturday and Sunday culinary scene in Santiago. Brunch is a combination of breakfast and lunch, and can include savory and sweet at the same meal, and essentially flies in the face of both the Chilean breakfast (it’s too big), and the Chilean lunch (it’s too varied). And while that might be the case, it’s catching on like crazy, with options at nearly every price point, and much of the length of the red line metro, from Las Condes down to Santiago Centro. 

  • World Tourism Day: 9 Reasons to Visit Peru Now

    People around the world are in the midst of celebrating my favorite pastime and ultimate passion – travel. Commemorated each year on Sept. 27, the United Nations created World Tourism Day back in 1980 as a way of recognizing the positive contributions travel makes to local economies, cultural preservation, environmental protection and personal growth and enrichment.

    Our planet is a big place, full of majestic destinations to discover. While there are a heap of world wonders to uncover, this amazing Andean nation should be toward the top of your list. Here are the nine reasons you should visit Peru now!

  • Photo: Kevin Raub

    Saude! Brazil’s Boteco Culture

    Believe it or not, the first time you land in Brazil, it can be kind of hard to find a bar; at least, what most of us from North America and Europe think of as a bar. It is not, however, particularly difficult to find a place where people are drinking! That’s because most Brazilians, especially outside major metropolitan areas, drink at a Brazilian institution known as a boteco (aka buteco or botequim), which comes from the Portuguese word “botica and the Spanish word “bodega,” originally meaning a grocery store to buy goods. According to Wikipedia, “In Brazil, the boteco (buteco), or botequim, was traditionally known as a place where alcoholic beverages were sold, serving as a meeting place for ‘bohemians,’ who looked for a good drink, cheap snacks and a chat without obligation.”

  • Buenos Aires Food Week is Back

    The fourth edition of the quickly growing biannual food event benefits the Buenos Aires food bank – and features fifteen new participating restaurants, Campari aperitifs, and a creative banana split with cognac that everyone’s talking about.

    More than 40 restaurants are onboard for the current edition of Buenos Aires Food Week, running now through September 14th. The three-course menus run AR$140 for lunch and only AR$220 for dinner, not including tip or drinks – unless, of course, you’re counting the complimentary aperitifs offered at many restaurants. Cocktails aside, Food Week is a convenient opportunity to sample the cuisine at some of the city’s more prestigious dining venues. I talked to Anne Reynolds, co-founder of the event, about highlights of this year’s line-up.

  • Tea Time in Bogotá

    Colombia’s most famous caffeinated beverage may come from beans, but that doesn’t mean there’s nothing around for the tea-lovers out there (the sheer number of British expats living in the country should reassure anyone with concerns on the matter). Though tea isn’t literally growing out the ground like coffee, there are a number of cafes and shops dedicated to the fine art of producing a great cup of tea – if you want the leaves read, though, you’ll probably have to go elsewhere.

    With its chilly Andean climate and international influence, Bogotá is one of the best places in the country to find a quality cup or two. So if you find yourself without much to do on a rainy Bogotá afternoon, grab a good book (or your iPad) and head to one of these steamy spots.

  • Wine Country in the Big City

    In winter, it’s quiet in Mendoza – temperatures drop, winemakers focus on protecting their grapes from occasional snowfall, visitors pass through on their way to ski resorts in the Andes. It’s the perfect moment for the region’s culinary talents to escape for a few weeks and bring their olive oil and Bonarda to the tables of Buenos Aires.

    Case in point: Zuccardi at the Palacio Duhau. Starting this week and extending through August 24th, a pair of creative young chefs – one from Familia Zuccardi’s Casa del Visitante in Mendoza, the other of the elegant Gioia restaurant at the Palacio Duhau–Park Hyatt, perhaps the grandest hotel in Buenos Aires – team up to present a special four-course menu with wine pairings.

  • Top 5 Places: Ceviche in Cartagena

    Though ceviche originated (and may have been perfected, depending on who you ask) in Peru, Colombia’s Atlantic coast has put its own distinctive spin on it – camarones en salsa rosada, anyone?

    Cartagena’s diverse and excellent food scene has the challenge of trying to cater to locals and international tourists alike, which has led restaurants to try to outdo each other when it comes to this coastal favorite. Each place – and each resident — has an individual interpretation of what makes a good ceviche, and the possibilities, from Asian fusion to traditional corvina, are almost as colorful as the city’s famous architecture. These are some of the best places in the city to go to get a taste of the full spectrum of flavors.

  • Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous at Ponta Dos Ganchos

    Let me preface this blog post by saying I have stayed in a lot of insane hotel rooms around the world. A lot. There was the absolutely ridiculous bungalow at the Six Senses Yao Noi, overlooking Phang Nga Bay in Ko Yao Noi, Thailand; there were the postcard-perfect vineyard views from the Poetry Inn in Sonoma, California; there was the memorable granite bathtub suite at Sabi Sands Game Reserve in South Africa; there was the insanely perfect Andes views from Cavas Wine Lodge in Mendoza, Argentina. The list goes on and on, nearly 80 countries deep at this point (don’t hate the player, hate the game).

  • Photo: Paul Silva

    Mistura 2014: Your Guide to Getting your Grub On

    While it’s only recently received a nod from the international food community for its innovative dishes, creative ingredients and chefs who are committed to nothing less than perfection, Peru is (and has always been) a serious food country. Case in point – each September it hosts Mistura, South America’s largest and most popular food festival. This year half a million hungry food enthusiasts are expected to visit Costa Verde de Magdalena for the ten-day event which kicks off September 5.

  • Aguardiente: Colombian Fire Water

    Brazil has its cachaça, Argentina has laid claim to Malbec, Peru and Chile are perpetually fighting over who has the “real” pisco, and we all know that Nicaragua and Cuba are the places to go for top-shelf rum. When it comes to cocktail hour, Colombia is often the forgotten stepchild, without a readily identifiable liquor to help define it on the world stage.

    But just because Colombia hasn’t pioneered something with the popularity of the caipirinha or the pisco sour, that doesn’t mean this dance-crazy country doesn’t love its liquor. Does it ever. 

  • Photo: Kevin Raub

    Weekend Getaway: Búzios

    French bombshell Brigitte Bardot didn’t discover Armação dos Búzios (Búzios for short) but when she decided in 1964, at the top of her fame, to hide away in this small, unknown fishing village north of Rio de Janeiro for three months, she helped the world discover Búzios. The timeline of this gorgeous Brazilian beach resort, home to 23 some-odd beaches, each more perfect than the next, can be divided in two parts: B.B (Before Bardot) and A.B (After Bardot).

  • 3 Winter Soups to Try in Chile

    Winter is upon us in Chile, and that means cooler temperatures, with more humidity, and the ever-present snow capped Andes on clear, sunshiny days. And with those cool temperatures come all the ways in which humans like to keep warm. We’ve got layers, and scarves, woolen gloves, hats and scarves. But perhaps the most warming thing of all is a nice bowl of hot soup.

    Chile has many soups to call its own, and though they are popular year-round, this is a particularly good time of year to order some cazuela, a caldillo, paila marina or mariscal.

  • Photo: Kevin Raub

    The Buffalo Brigade: A Visit to Ilha do Marajó

    When the first thing I saw upon arrival was a young girl bathing her dog in the river, I knew things were different on Ilha do Marajó, a river island nearly the size of Switzerland at the mouth of the Amazonas, Tocantins and Xingú rivers on the northern tip of Pará state. Outside of urban areas, most Brazilians wouldn’t think twice about a dirty dog, but the Marajoara do things their own way. So much so that ironically enough, dogs aren’t even the usual pet of choice.

  • Photo: Kevin Raub

    Cachaça for the Uninitiated

    If you’ve come to Brazil to take part in the national revelry of one of the world’s greatest sporting events, you no doubt weren’t in country all of an hour before a caipirinha ended up in your hands. Brazil is nearly as proud of its ubiquitous national cocktail as it is its national football team. Caipirinhas are so popular – and so good – that you now find them on bar menus the world over, the latest Latin cocktail, like the daiquiri, mojito and the pisco sour, to become the flavor of the month outside its borders. The ingredients of the classic caipirinha are simple: limes, sugar and cachaça, Brazil’s national spirit.

    Ca-what? Cuh-sha-shuh.

  • 2 Sweet Wintertime Chilean Treats

    You can count on winter weather in Chile starting in about May. By June, the Andes are covered in a blanket of white, waiting for eager skiers and snowboarders to take to the slopes, and on clear days, after a rain, everyone keeps one eye on the snowy Andes at almost all times. There are lots of places to get a good view of the Andes in Santiago, from a bridge over the Mapocho River, from up on Cerro San Cristobal, or even just peeking between the buildings downtown or on a trip to the mall.

    And that winter chill will have you wrapping a cozy scarf around your neck, or planning your run between the occasional raindrops down in the city that mean snow in the mountains. Now you’ve got keeping yourself warm, or warming yourself up from the outside down pat. But what about warming yourself up from the inside? That’s where these two sweet treats come in. They are traditionally consumed in the winter months in Chile. There’s one to drink, and one to eat, never together. That would be too much sweet goodness all at once.

  • Santa Marta: A Colombian Foodie Paradise

    Cartagena’s swanky restaurants may get most of the attention, but there’s a gastronomic haven springing up in the middle of the sun-kissed beaches about four hours up the coast. Once a small town catering mostly to surfers and backpackers, the last few years have seen a boom in international cuisine in Santa Marta, bringing chefs and flavors from everywhere from the United States to Lebanon. Folks may arrive in Santa Marta just expecting to enjoy a few days at the beach, but nobody leaves hungry. Here are a few of the best places to dine in town before heading off to the nearby Tayrona National Park:

  • Where to Eat in Brazil? A Map of the Best Restaurants

    With the soccer event of the year nearly here, Brazil is the destination of choice for many travelers. If you’re jetting off to one of the host cities, make sure to check out its bustling culinary scene. But where to find the best food? Our friend and food blogger Gaby Dalkin from What’s Gaby Cooking rounded up her favorite places in a fun map on where to eat in Brazil. From the best caipirinhas in Fortaleza to the traditional Brazilian seafood stew moqueca in Salvador, each host city offers an unforgettable gastronomical adventure. Read the full story here.

  • Peruvian Food in Bogotá

    Peruvian food is one of the most popular kinds of international cuisine, thanks to its variety, diverse flavors and opportunities for creative interpretation, and Colombia’s capital is all in on the foodie craze. Whether it’s because of the geographic proximity or the fact that some folks prefer their ceviche without salsa rosada (it’s a Caribbean coast thing, I don’t understand it either), Bogotanos seem to have developed an insatiable appetite for all culinary things Peruvian over the last decade or so.

  • Photo: Kevin Raub

    Jungle Love: 48-Hour Foodie Binge in Belém

    When Brazilians talk food, they’ll usually tell you the gauchos in the South are the best at beef, Paulistanos are the best at pizza and everything gourmet and the Mineiros are the best at pretty much everything they pour their hearts into. Well, way up in the middle of the Amazon jungle is Belém, the second biggest city in the Amazon after Manaus, and people say folks from there and throughout the state of Pará, the Paraenses, are the Mineiros of the North. That is to say, they take their food muito sério!

  • Photo: Kevin Raub

    São Paulo Street Food Starts Its Engines!

    It’s Good Friday in São Paulo and the sun is shining. Revelers abound in the bohemian neighborhood of Vila Madalena outside A Queijaria, one of two actual artisan cheese shops in town. Today, the shop has taken their wares to the streets, along with some ice-cold craft brews, and made an event out of it. Parked alongside, crowds are swarming the Buzina Food Truck, where a culinary couple armed with an impressive resume under their aprons are dishing up organic chicken curries, pulled pork sandwiches, gourmet burgers and hand-cut, never-frozen French fries. A curious Brazilian woman walks up to me inquisitively: “What are these guys selling in this truck?” she asks, a little confused.

  • Around Peru in 8 Dishes

    Peru is the “gastronomic mecca” of the world. That, according to The Economist, a current affairs magazine that covers culture, politics and news. The prestigious periodical just wrote an in-depth piece about the somewhat recent Peruvian food debut onto the world-side stage.

    Perhaps it’s the eclectic blend of flavors from the sea, the sierra and the selva, or maybe it’s the fusion of multi-cultural flavors alongside native ingredients. Whatever it is, Peru is in the spotlight and now its haute cuisine is even being exported abroad and served up eateries across the globe.

    While traveling throughout each region (the coast, the mountains and the jungle) is the ideal way to taste each distinct dish, there may be a faster, easier way to savor the extensive menu. Until recently, Lima was just a layover city, a place for tourists to lie their heads before heading to Cusco and the Incan ruins of Machu Picchu. But now some 75,000 visitors stop in the capital city each year just to tickle their taste buds. If you plan on being among them, you are in store for a treat. 

  • Photo: Kevin Raub

    Beyond Brahma: Brazil’s 10 Best Craft Beers

    As recently as just three years ago, you’d have been hard-pressed to find a beer in Brazil that wasn’t watered-down lager serving a single purpose: Beat the tropical heat with a buzz. Brazil’s most common beers (Brahma, Skol, Antarctica, Nova Shin) are all about as interesting as television static, despite being drunk in copious amounts by millions of Brazilians on a daily basis; in bars, at the beach, at barbeques – wherever you are in Brazil – you’ll find the majority of Brazilians quite happily content with more or less tasteless lagers, served on draft in small cups at least half full or more of foam (the entire country has been duped into believing a massive head keeps the beer cold longer –  it doesn’t; it’s a lie perpetuated by Brazil’s biggest breweries and immortalized by bars the country over so they may serve the population half a beer for the price of a whole one!). For a beer country, it was all so distinctly average.

  • Lessons in Wine, and in Life, with Uncorking Argentina

    Learning about Malbec grapes – and the importance of creativity, tradition, pleasure, and family – in Argentina’s wine capital.

    When an opportunity arises to visit Argentina’s most famous wine region during harvest, there’s only one thing to do: pack your bags. But you don’t want to show up in Mendoza without a plan. There’s so much to do – wineries, mountains to climb, rivers to raft, a landscape so vast that you need to have a few priorities in mind.

  • Photo: Kinoshita

    Sushi in São Paulo: The Top Four (It’s Too Expensive to Eat at More than Four!)

    Sushi is everywhere in Brazil’s biggest city. As I’m sure you’ve no doubt read, São Paulo is home to the largest Japanese population outside of Japan, centered in and around the fascinating neighborhood of Liberdade (we’re not even sure if that fact has ever been substantiated but there you go). The problem is, the majority of it is unimpressive, sold as all-you-can-eat extravaganzas from bad buffet restaurants whose fish selection rarely extends beyond imported farmed salmon six different ways. Não, obrigado.

    Why subject yourself to a bad Brazilian experience when you can have an authentic Japanese one in Brazil? There are some serious, serious sushi joints in São Paulo. If you know the right places to go, you’ll do a double-take and check your passport as you enter.


  • Ñam: Unmissable Gastronomical Party

    For the fourth year in a row, the food summit ñam (say: nyam) will take place in Santiago Chile. This event, the name of which means, simply “yum” in Spanish, pulls together some of Latin America (and Spain)’s best chefs. The chefs will give workshops, talks, demonstrations, and of course, prepare food that participants can taste. In attendance there will be chefs from Chile, as well as visiting chefs from Argentina, Colombia, Spain, Guatemala, Peru, Venezuela and Mexico.

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    Peru on a Plate: Around the World in Eight Dishes

    The Spanish may have been the first to emigrate to Peru, but they certainly weren’t the last. Perhaps it’s the eternal spring along the coast, or maybe its the rich history and culture that draw the international crowd. Whatever it is, people from all over the globe have been leaving their native lands and calling Peru home for more than half a millennium and with each group comes their traditions, their culture and, of course, their food. 

  • The Wide, Wild World of Colombian Fruit

    Wander into any market or fruit stand in Colombia, and you may be forgiven for thinking you’ve stepped into an alternate universe or been whisked away to some alien planet. The containers spill over with all manner of brightly hued shapes – some with strange spines, otherworldly colors or scaly skin that looks more dangerous than edible. Rest assured, though, under all those alarming layers, there’s a whole delicious world waiting to be unpeeled.

  • Photo: rafa-alves

    Day and Night: Santiago’s Bellavista Neighborhood

    Every day of travel brings something new. But most people like to try to fit in a bit of food, drink, activity, culture and shopping in there somewhere. The problem is planning on getting to the places where these things can be had at exactly the right time.

    Enter Santiago’s quirky Bellavista neighborhood. Sandwiched between the Mapocho River to the south, and the towering Cerro San Cristobal to the north, this area has something to offer in all of the above categories with something to suit every budget and taste, from backpacker to luxury.

  • Photo: avlxyz

    Eating Asian Food in Santiago

    When you think of ethnic food in Santiago, you might think of food from other Latin American nations. We have our share of Peruvian restaurants, and a few Brazilian and Colombian places, including some new eateries serving arepas and tropical juices. And of course, there are also a couple of well-reviewed Argentine steakhouses.

    But what might surprise you is that in recent years, as the face of immigration to this sizeable city changes, and the Chilean palate opens to new experiences, we’re also seeing a large culinary expansion into Asian food.

  • Experiencing Argentina, With an International Twist

    There are plenty of places in Buenos Aires where you can get a good steak. There are not, however, plenty of places in Buenos Aires where you can get a good steak and also learn how to properly fold an empanada, serve mate, and communicate with your taxi driver using only hand gestures.

    To acquire this particular skill set, you’ll need some porteño friends – or you can just sign up to spend an evening at the Argentine Experience. Despite its gleaming storefront in Palermo Hollywood, it’s not exactly a restaurant; regardless of the checkered aprons and empanada diagrams, it’s not a cooking class, either. It’s a ‘culinary experience’ run by an enthusiastic multinational team – Argentine, English, Brazilian – dedicated to introducing tourists to national traditions with a gourmet twist. I heard they happen to serve one of the finest steaks in town, so this past weekend, I went to check it out for myself.

  • Independent Cafés: Serving Bogotá’s Best Coffee

    Colombia is famous the world over for its high-quality Arabica coffee, but for years a strange paradox has dictated the reality of coffee culture within the country itself. With most of the best quality beans tagged for export to other latte-loving countries, Colombians themselves have often been left sipping the dregs of the harvest, or relying on a few local chains for their caffeine fix. Fortunately, this has begun to change, as more serious café owners and baristas have worked to create a discerning domestic coffee culture. Nowhere is this more apparent than the capital of Bogotá, where excellent brews are available to all – as long as you know where to look. There are many locations now meeting a high standard of coffee preparation, but these five are some of the ones that truly stand out from the crowd.

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