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  • Exploring an Outdoor Art Gallery in Buenos Aires

    Living in Buenos Aires is like living in an open-air art gallery where the exhibitions don’t change — they simply accumulate, slowly crowding the city walls with larger-than-life murals and bold stencils that seem to appear overnight. On a recent tour with Buenos Aires Street Art, our guide, Sophia, explains the phenomenon in the simplest terms: “It’s really easy to paint here,” she says. “It’s really easy to get a wall.”

  • Photo: Rooftop-show-in-San-Telmo-Buenos Aires

    A Breathtaking Rooftop Show in Buenos Aires

    If there’s one thing you shouldn’t miss in Buenos Aires right now, it’s this. Al Ver Verás / Música Para Mirar (Music to Watch) is a spectacularly original rooftop show that uses the towering walls in Buenos Aires buildings as blank canvases on which to project images and animation set to live music performances and DJ-spun tracks. Hard to picture? That’s what I thought, too. But it’s magical: you just have to see it for yourself.

  • Photo: Embratur

    Charming Cobblestones: Brazil’s Sleepiest Colonial Towns

    The Portuguese left an indelible mark on Brazil when they finally got out of town in 1822. There are number of charming colonial towns built by the Portuguese throughout the country. These sleepy towns and villages, flush with whitewashed architecture accented by a kaleidoscopic array of flash and color, are the perfect spots to kickback with nothing to do but wander the stuck-in-time cobblestoned streets. No photographic skills necessary, these gems do all the work for you, around each and every turn a new postcard Brazilian moment.

    If you visit any of these sleepy Kodak-moment towns, you can impress the locals with your knowledge of the local vernacular. The word for “cobblestones” is one of the most entertaining words in Portuguese: Paralelepípedos.

    Good luck with that!

  • Photo: Terra Hall

    Channelling Andy Warhol: Lima “Pops” with Two Temporary Modern Art Exhibits

    Walk down any street in Peru’s densely populated capital and you’re sure to become enveloped in this city of contrasts. Modern skyscrapers neighbour colonial mansions with Spanish tile roofs. Restaurants serving ancient Peruvian recipes like anticuchos also dish up new fusion-style cuisine. And museums abound, some with artifacts from another era, others with contemporary art from some of the 20th century’s most influential photographers.

    Such examples of this can be found in Barranco’s two art museums where haute couture fashion photographers’ work is currently on display in both permanent and temporary exhibitions. 

  • Sunday Funday in Liberdade

    São Paulo’s Liberdade neighborhood is the epicenter of what is said to be the largest Japanese population outside Japan. Brazil is home to an estimated 1.5 million Japanese-Brazilians, many of them living right here in this bustling neighborhood 1km south of Centro, with a tad bit of Chinese and Korean sprinkled in for good measure (some of the city’s best Chinese restaurants are here and South Korea’s Melona honeydew melon-flavored popsicles are wildly popular in the streets as well).

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